You might not think it, but training for tennis isn't all about cardio and practising out on a court. If you take your tennis really seriously, then you need to make sure you include strength training into your workout routine. We don't mean building muscle to look like a weightlifter, but toning up your muscles can really help improve your tennis game.


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  1. Bench Press
  2. Medicine Ball Throws
  3. Kettlebell Swings
  4. Box Jumps

Bench Press

a woman in the gym doing a bench press as a strength training exercise for tennis

The bench press is designed to tone your upper body and arms, the areas of your body needed to serve in tennis. Bench pressing regularly can strengthen your arms and chest up and improve your serves out on the court. If you think weights aren't for you, you don't have to bench press a lot. If you're new to weights, start with just the barbell or the lightest dumbbells, they are usually heavy enough alone for a first-timer.

Check out how to bench press here!

Medicine Ball Throws

a man box doing medicine ball throws as a strength training exercise for tennis

The next exercise is Medicine ball throws are great for strengthening your upper body too and have the added help of improving your racket swings and coordination. Medicine balls themselves can be quite heavy, and the exercise does what it says on the tin. Just face a wall, stand with your feet shoulder-width apart and throw the ball. Hitting a target will help you improve your coordination when on the court but also helps you keep your body stable. If you can stay in one place throwing that, you should be good for staying upright whilst playing tennis. The strength it builds in your arms can also result in more power behind your swings.

Kettlebell Swings

2 women doing kettlebell swings as a strength training exercise for tennis

Kettlebell swings are a perfect exercise to really improve lots of areas of your tennis game. Doing this exercise can work nearly every muscle in your body, so not only does it improve your swings and hits, but by strengthening your legs, it can improve your agility and speed. It also improves your balance by strengthening your core muscles, and we all know balance is vital to playing tennis. There are tonnes more benefits to doing kettlebell swings, so just go out and give it a try; it really is a game-changer.

Box Jumps

a woman doing box jumps as a strength training exercise for tennis

Finally, we have box jumps. Sometimes in tennis, you need to be able to leap to reach those far away shots, and box jumping can help improve that. Plyoboxes can give you a fun, low impact workout to strengthen your arms and legs and really improve any jumping and diving you might need to do. Plyoboxes are designed to absorb the shock of your jump, so you are at low risk of an injury, but they are also designed so that you can lay them on different sides to change the height you will be jumping on to. This means you can work up to different heights if you are just starting, and it allows you to see yourself improve.

Check out how to box jump here!


general

Before beginning any exercise or nutrition program, consult your physician, doctor or other professional. This is especially important for individuals over the age of 35 or persons with pre-existing health problems. Exercise.co.uk assumes no responsibility for personal injury or property damage sustained using our advice.

If you experience dizziness, nausea, chest pain, or any other abnormal symptoms, stop the workout at once and consult a physician or doctor immediately.